FAQ’s

While an eye exam can be performed on very young puppies (and often is when congenital conditions are suspected), in most cases we suggest waiting until the dog is fully mature – over a year of age.

No. Cataracts are caused by a change in the lens inside the eye. Early examination is needed to identify any complicating factors and to determine the optimal time for surgery. If surgery is delayed, the success of the procedure can be much less.

We recognize the importance of working with your primary care veterinarian, and regularly communicate by phone and by written correspondence. Laboratory test results and other information are shared as needed.

Our practice is limited to treatment of the eye.

Screening of dogs for inherited eye diseases is an important service provided by a veterinary ophthalmologist. There are many types of genetic eye conditions, including cataracts, retinal dysplasia and retinal degeneration which occur with a higher incidence in purebred dogs. This screening examination is used to detect early forms of these conditions in dogs that do not yet exhibit symptoms. This is particularly important if breeding is being contemplated. The OFA(Orthopedic Foundation for Animals) maintains a registry of animals that have been examined by a veterinary ophthalmologist and found to be free of significant inherited eye conditions.

Payment is required at the time services are rendered. Veterinary Vision accepts cash, checks, credit cards (Visa, Mastercard and Discover) as payment. We understand that unexpected medical expenses can be difficult and eye conditions need to be treated promptly. CareCredit is an option for deferring payment, with several plans with low to no interest.

Appointments for both our offices are scheduled by calling 650-551-1115 or 800-427-5367. We have Saturday appointments in both offices and these appointments are often filled several weeks in advance. Our priority is the best possible care for your pet. We will always accommodate emergencies, however it may not be possible for an urgent appointment to occur at the location or with the doctor that you normally see. We will try to remind you of your appointment in advance by either phone or email, whichever you prefer. The reminder is sent by email 2 days in advance; if you do not get your email that often, tell us to phone you instead. We ask for a minimum of 24 hours for cancellation of scheduled appointments.

  • Signs of discomfort, either localized (squinting, rubbing at the eye) or generalized. Animals with glaucoma often act depressed, as though they have a headache.
  • Change in appearance of the eye – cloudiness, redness
  • Discharge from the eye, especially anything other than clear tears
  • Change in vision – hesitating when going down stairs, won’t play with toys

Any of these symptoms that occur suddenly and seem severe or are associated with a known injury to the eye may be an emergency. An ophthalmologist is available for emergency consultation and treatment if needed. Click her for more information on Ophthalmic Emergencies. We ask for a minimum of 24 hours for cancellation of scheduled appointments. We also examine performance dogs – those that compete in agility, flyball, and tracking. For these dogs, small changes in vision can result in significantly reduced performance. Although we don’t prescribe glasses, we are able to detect refractive errors and, in some cases, prescribe corrective contact lenses for performance dogs.

Board-certified veterinary ophthalmologists are required to complete a four-year veterinary program followed by an additional 3-4 years of internship and residency. Following the residency, candidates must pass rigorous testing requirements to achieve board certification by the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists. In addition to their advanced training, ophthalmologists have specialized instruments used to examine the eyes. They are able to see things that would not be visible on a routine examination.